CRS Score for Federal Skilled Worker Program

How to Calculate a Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) Score for the Federal Skilled Worker Program

 

The Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) is a points-based system used by the Canadian government to assess and rank Express Entry candidates who apply under the Federal Skilled Worker Program (FSWP) as well as other economic immigration programs.

 

The Comprehensive Ranking System is used to evaluate candidates based on various factors such as their age, education, language proficiency, work experience, and other factors. Candidates are awarded points for each of these factors, and the total number of points they receive determines their CRS score.

 

The CRS score is important because it is used to rank candidates against each other in the Express Entry pool. The Canadian government issues Invitations to Apply (ITAs) for permanent residency to candidates with the highest CRS scores during regular draws from the pool. Candidates who receive ITAs can then apply for permanent residency in Canada.

 

The Comprehensive Ranking System score is a critical component of the Express Entry system and can greatly impact a candidate’s chances of receiving an ITA and ultimately obtaining permanent residency in Canada.

 

Steps to calculate a Comprehensive Ranking System score

 

Step 1: Determine Basic Eligibility

 

Before calculating your Comprehensive Ranking System score, you should determine if you are eligible to apply for the Federal Skilled Worker Program. The eligibility requirements include having at least one year of skilled work experience, meeting the minimum language proficiency level, and having enough funds to support yourself and any accompanying family members. You should also have your foreign education assessed to ensure that it is equivalent to Canadian education standards.

 

Step 2: Complete the Express Entry Profile

 

To be considered for permanent residence under the Federal Skilled Worker Program, you must create an Express Entry profile and provide information about your work experience, education, language proficiency, and other personal details. You will also need to provide your National Occupational Classification (NOC)

 

After completing your Express Entry profile for the Federal Skilled Worker Program you will be given a Comprehensive Ranking Score. This score is also known as the CRS score and is calculated as follows:

 

Calculate Comprehensive Ranking System points

 

The maximum CRS score a candidate can receive is 1,200. The points are awarded based on the following factors:

 

Age: Maximum 110 points

 

Age is an important factor in the Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) used by the Canadian government to assess and rank Express Entry candidates for the Federal Skilled Worker Program (FSWP).

 

The points for age are awarded based on the following breakdown:

 

  • Candidates between the ages of 18 and 35 can receive a maximum of 110 points

 

  • Candidates over the age of 35 will start losing points, with 1 point lost for each year of age. For example, a candidate who is 36 years old would receive 109 points (110-1), a candidate who is 37 would receive 108 points (110-2) and so on.

 

  • Candidates over the age of 45 will not receive any points for age

 

The rationale behind the age factor is that younger candidates are more likely to have a longer working life in Canada and will contribute more to the Canadian economy over time. The age factor also takes into consideration the ability of a candidate to learn a new language or adapt to a new environment which can be more challenging for older candidates.

 

Level of education: Maximum 150 points

 

The level of education is one of the factors that contribute to a candidate’s Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) score for the Federal Skilled Worker Program (FSWP) and other economic immigration programs in Canada. The maximum number of points that can be awarded for education is 150.

 

The points for education are awarded based on the following breakdown:

 

  • Candidates with a secondary school (high school) diploma or less are not eligible for points in this category.

 

  • Candidates with a completed foreign credential that’s equivalent to a Canadian secondary school or trade diploma can receive 28 points.

 

  • Candidates with a completed foreign credential that’s equivalent to a Canadian one-year post-secondary program (college or trade) can receive 84 points.

 

  • Candidates with a completed foreign credential that’s equivalent to a Canadian two-year post-secondary program (college or trade) can receive 91 points.

 

  • Candidates with a completed foreign credential that’s equivalent to a Canadian bachelor’s degree can receive 112 points.

 

  • Candidates with a completed foreign credential that’s equivalent to a Canadian two or more post-secondary program (master’s or PhD) can receive 126 points.

 

  • Candidates with a completed Canadian post-secondary credential (of any level) can receive 30 points in addition to the points allocated for their level of education.

 

The rationale behind the education factor is that candidates with higher levels of education are often better equipped to integrate into the Canadian labor market.

 

Official language proficiency: Maximum 136 points (French and English skills are both evaluated)

 

The official language capacity of a candidate refers to their proficiency in either English or French which are the two official languages in Canada. The points for language proficiency are awarded based on the candidate’s ability to read, write, speak and listen in either English or French.

 

The candidate’s language proficiency is evaluated through an approved language exam, such as the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) or the Canadian English Language Proficiency Index Program (CELPIP) for English, and the test d’évaluation de français (TEF) for French.

 

The points for language proficiency are awarded based on the following breakdown:

 

  • Candidates who achieve a Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB) level 9 or higher in all four language abilities (reading, writing, speaking, and listening) in either English or French can receive a maximum of 34 points for the first language and a maximum of 24 points for the second language, for a total of 58 points.

 

  • Candidates who achieve a CLB level 7 or 8 in all four language abilities in either English or French can receive a maximum of 16 points for the first language and a maximum of 8 points for the second language, for a total of 24 points.

 

  • Candidates who achieve a CLB level 5 or 6 in all four language abilities in either English or French can receive a maximum of 6 points for the first language and a maximum of 6 points for the second language, for a total of 12 points.

 

  • Candidates who achieve a CLB level 4 or lower in any language ability in either English or French will not receive any points for language proficiency.

 

The rationale behind the language proficiency factor is that candidates who are proficient in either English or French are more likely to integrate into the Canadian society and labor market. Canada places a strong emphasis on linguistic dexterity particularly in English or French because language skills are essential for communicating effectively in the workplace and in the community.

 

Canadian work experience: Maximum 80 points

 

Canadian work experience is a factor that contributes to a candidate’s Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) score for the Federal Skilled Worker Program (FSWP). The Canadian government allocates a maximum of 80 points for Canadian work experience.

 

The points for Canadian work experience are awarded based on the number of years of experience the candidate has acquired in a skilled occupation in Canada. A skilled occupation is defined as an occupation that falls under National Occupational Classification (NOC) skill level 0, A, or B.

 

The points for Canadian work experience are awarded based on the following breakdown:

 

  • Candidates who have at least one year of skilled work experience in Canada can receive a maximum of 40 points.

 

  • Candidates who have at least two years of skilled work experience in Canada can receive a maximum of 53 points.

 

  • Candidates who have at least three years of skilled work experience in Canada can receive a maximum of 64 points.

 

  • Candidates who have at least four or more years of skilled work experience in Canada can receive a maximum of 80 points.

 

The rationale behind the Canadian work experience factor is that candidates with Canadian work experience are more likely to integrate into the Canadian labor market and have a higher chance of success in the Canadian economy.

 

Spouse or common-law partner factors for the Comprehensive Ranking System

 

This category is worth a maximum of 40 points. Points are awarded based on the following factors:

 

Spouse Education (maximum of 10 points)

 

If the spouse or common-law partner has completed a minimum of a one-year post-secondary program in Canada, the candidate can receive 10 points.

 

Spouse Language proficiency (maximum of 20 points)

 

  • If the spouse or common-law partner achieves a Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB) level 4 or higher in all four language abilities in either English or French, the candidate can receive a maximum of 5 points for the first language and a maximum of 5 points for the second language, for a total of 10 points.

 

  • If the spouse or common-law partner achieves a CLB level 5 or higher in all four language abilities in either English or French, the candidate can receive a maximum of 5 points for the first language and a maximum of 5 points for the second language, for a total of 10 points.

 

Spouse Work experience (maximum of 10 points) for the Comprehensive Ranking System

 

  • If the spouse or common-law partner has at least one year of skilled work experience in Canada, the candidate can receive a maximum of 5 points.

 

  • If the spouse or common-law partner has at least two years of skilled work experience in Canada, the candidate can receive a maximum of 10 points.

 

The rationale behind the spouse or common-law partner factor is that a candidate’s spouse or common law partner may also have skills and qualifications that can contribute to the candidate’s success in the Canadian economy.

 

 

Skill transferability factors

 

Skill transferability factors are designed to assess the candidate’s ability to succeed in the Canadian labor market based on their education, work experience and language proficiency. The CRS system evaluates how well the candidate’s education and work experience match with Canadian labor market needs and how well the candidate can adapt to the Canadian economy.

 

There are five skill transferability factors

Education

 

If the candidate has completed a post-secondary degree and has a strong official language proficiency (CLB 7 or higher) in both English and French, the candidate can receive a maximum of 50 points.

 

Foreign work experience

 

If the candidate has at least three years of foreign work experience in a skilled occupation and has a strong official language proficiency (CLB 7 or higher) in both English and French, the candidate can receive a maximum of 50 points.

 

Canadian work experience and the Comprehensive Ranking System

 

If the candidate has at least one year of skilled work experience in Canada and has a strong official language proficiency (CLB 7 or higher) in both English and French, the candidate can receive a maximum of 50 points.

 

Certificate of qualification

 

If the candidate has a certificate of qualification in a trade occupation issued by a Canadian province or territory, and has a strong official language proficiency (CLB 5 or higher) in both English and French, the candidate can receive a maximum of 50 points.

 

Additional combinations

 

If the candidate has a combination of education, foreign work experience, and Canadian work experience, and has a strong official language proficiency (CLB 7 or higher) in both English and French, the candidate can receive a maximum of 50 points.

 

The rationale behind the skill transferability factors is that the Canadian government wants to ensure that candidates who possess skills and qualifications that are in demand in the Canadian labor market are given priority for immigration to Canada.

 

Additional points

 

  • Canadian education: Maximum 30 points

 

  • French language proficiency: Maximum 30 points

 

  • Provincial nomination: Maximum 600 points

 

  • Sibling living in Canada: Maximum 15 points

 

  • Strong French language skills combined with English language skills: Maximum 50 points

 

  • Post-secondary education in Canada: Maximum 30 points

 

  • Arranged employment: Maximum 200 points

 

Candidates who receive a provincial nomination from one of Canada’s provinces or territories are automatically awarded 600 additional points which effectively guarantees an invitation to apply for permanent residency.

 

If you are confused about the CRS Points System then take a Free Assessment for the Answers

Subject Matter Expert at Visa Bureau | Website | + posts

Jacqueline Chow is an international immigration and visa expert with over 15 years of experience in the field. With a background in law and a passion for helping people, Jacqueline has built a reputation as a trusted and reliable source of information and advice on all aspects of immigration and visas. She has worked with clients from all over the world, including high-net-worth individuals, professionals, skilled workers and families. As a sought-after speaker and commentator Jacqueline has been featured in various media outlets and has given talks on immigration and visas at conferences and events around the world.

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